CPA Members Profiles - B

CPA Members Profiles – B

For a complete list of Association members, please see our Member Listing web page.

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Chris Barnes

Chris Barnes

Thrown stoneware pottery gas fired in reduction to Orton cone 9.
Workshop at The Knott,
Ainstable,
Carlisle,
Cumbria
CA4 9RW

Ruta Bartkevičiūtė

Ruta Bartkevičiūtė

Ruta Bartkevičiūtė studied at Vilnius‘ Art Academy and gained a ceramists master's degree in 2013. Since 2008 she began take part in group exhibitions , symposiums , competitions , art residencies in Lithuania, Latvia, Germany, Denmark, Italy and the UK . Since 2010 she held three solo exhibitions. She lives in the United Kingdom and works as an independent artist in her studio. At the moment Ruta is creating ornamental and functional ceramics in her studio such as vases, jars, bowls, cups, teapots and smaller souvenirs. In her work you may feel vivid and clear connection to her nation, history and people.
Her ceramic decor focuses on distinctively restored ancient Baltic symbols, particularly in the tree of life. They are given a modern playful shape with bright colours and other symbolic elements. Old forms are then reborn in contemporary art. This creates an unbroken cultural chain while maintaining the essential aspects of existence. The world portrayed by the artist has a positive energy charge. Particular emphasised topics are natural cycle of life, natural, harmony, love and happiness. You could say that Rutas‘ work is saturated in the essence of life so much that you may say there‘s a permanent feeling of spring residing on her art.

Svend Bayer - Honorary Fellow

Svend Bayer - Honorary Fellow

I make a range of pots from very large pots for the garden to small beakers.
I use a locally mined stoneware clay and fire with wood.I am interested in the way that very ordinary glazes are transformed by ash and embers in very long wood firings.

Deborah Baynes

Deborah Baynes

All my work is stoneware, is thrown and often altered and then Salt Glazed to 1300C, in a downdraft, oil-fired kiln.
My workshop is at my home in Shotley, which is on the East Coast a few miles from Ipswich.

Helen Beard

Helen Beard

I fell in love with clay while I was at Edinburgh College of Art studying for a degree in Jewellery design. It was the immediacy of clay, the smooth texture and its ability to move and react to your every touch that, in the end, resulted in my moving class and eventually finding a career as a potter.
After college, I continued my training under the supervision of Edmund de Waal. He taught me to throw on the potter's wheel and introduced me to porcelain. I'm still using the same clay today.
I now work from my busy Clerkenwell studio where I make, draw, design and sometimes teach. I love the local area and find it inspires much of my work here. There are all sorts of characters who crop up again and again on my pots, from swimmers at Ironmonger Row baths to market traders at Smithfield market.
I like to come up with new ideas for each of my shows, varying the themes around different places that have struck a chord in me. By grouping my pots together, I like to tell a story - creating whimsical scenes that capture the insignificant yet precious moments that make up our daily lives.
My bespoke ceramics, which are each individually thrown on the wheel and hand painted, are made for exhibitions and commissions. I often collaborate with private clients, luxury retailers, galleries and museums; for example recent commissions include designing and making a bespoke range of porcelain for Fortnum and Mason and The National Gallery.

Peter Beard - Fellow

Peter Beard - Fellow

I have been making sculptural and vessel based ceramics for over 40 years, exhibiting regularly both in UK and internationally. My work is represented in numerous public and private collections worldwide.
I work in an intuitive way, constantly sketching and experimenting with new forms and processes. My forms are strong and simple but have complex surfaces. Each piece works as a whole, combining form and pattern.
My work usually uses techniques of layering glaze and painting patterns with wax between the layers of glaze, the wax acting as a resist for subsequent layers. This meticulous process creates complex patterns and textures within the glazes. The work is fired to stoneware temperatures.
Alongside my wax resist work I am making “ground” pieces on which many layers of coloured clay and glaze are built up and then ground back to reveal colour and patterns within the structure. Work is stoneware and porcelain fired, usually, to 1280°C.
Alongside my ceramic practice, I also work in cast bronze.
I continue to push the boundaries of my skills, and am not afraid to take risks, to produce timeless, beautiful objects which people will enjoy having in their homes and workplaces.

Kochevet Bendavid

Kochevet Bendavid

My luxurious tableware is intended to offer exciting and imaginative possibilities for presenting food, and to enhance the pleasure of sharing a meal.
I mix small amounts of paper-fibre with Limoges Porcelain and manipulate the clay while it’s very wet, combining throwing and slab-building to create soft, flowing forms. The silky white glaze and golden rim provide an effective background for food presentation.

Rob Bibby

Rob Bibby

I make thrown earthenware glazed functional pottery. My work is painted using brush and sponge techniques to create a variety of images from flowers to yachts in style a bit like watercolour painting.
I work in a converted Methodist chapel in East Northants not far from Peterborough.

Matthew Blakely - Fellow

Matthew Blakely - Fellow

My work explores the links between ceramics and geology and place, making pieces entirely from geological samples that I have collected from specific locations around the country, and that illustrate the ceramic qualities inherent in these materials.
There is an extremely varied geology in the UK with a spectacular range of rocks and minerals ranging from recent river deposits to some of the oldest rocks on the planet. Many of these have been quarried at some stage during the human occupation of the country, though mostly for processes other than ceramics, such as building or making roads.
The pieces that I make illustrate another way of looking at these materials and the colours and textures that they are capable of producing in the kiln: inspiration coming from the materials themselves, the qualities that they develop in firings and the places that I have collected them from.
I am working with a wide range of different rocks and clays, using firing types and temperatures that bring out the best in them. Increasingly my approach becomes simpler and simpler, taking ceramics back to its essence. I use these materials as unrefined as possible: rocks are crushed by hand, milled and blended to create the glazes, clays are often used as dug straight from the ground.
All of the work here has been fired in my wood kilns using waste wood that has grown where I live in Cambridgeshire.

Charles Bound

Charles Bound

Clay objects, wood fired

Clive Bowen - Fellow

Clive Bowen - Fellow

Wood fired earthenware ranging from small domestic ware to large individual pieces. Most of the work is wheel thrown but there are also hand built pots,pressed ware and tiles.
The work is once-fired to 1060.

Daniel Boyle

Daniel Boyle

Daniel Boyle has lived and worked in Wales for the past 18 years since graduating in studio ceramics from Harrow College of Art, London in 1991.
He makes one-off functional salt glazed stoneware works, to hold and interact with – things to be used and enjoyed.
Every part of the making process contributes to the work produced, the throwing and turning marks, the impressed patterns and the fluid textured glazes.
He fires using wood and gas-fired salt kilns to 1300° with all their variations and challenges.
The slips and ashes used highlight where the flame has touched the pots causing running and movement - producing glazes reflecting landscapes and creating a glaze to be explored beyond their surface.

Loretta Braganza - Fellow

Loretta Braganza - Fellow

Trained in graphics with a fine arts background. Makes hand built sculptural forms. The clay used is St Thomas’ body fixed to 1127 C. The pots are sometimes refired to achieve further depth of colour and texture. The linear decorative technique using coloured slips and underglaze colours is constantly evolving.
Strong abstract shapes are linked by deceptively simple surface patterning. My aim is to balance process, material and idea creating individual pieces that together form sculptural groups. They start with a series of related shapes each animating the other creating a balanced tension within the group.
In the series ‘Turning Stones’, forms can be positioned in different ways so changing their dynamics and viewer experience. They reflect the teetering granite boulders in Hampi, South India.
The popularly named ‘Twelve Apostles’ were inspired by the giant sea stacks along the Great Ocean Road, Australia – which are still evolving, eroded by the elements. On each piece I am attempting to capture in a single dynamic moment the interaction of sea, foam, spray, strata & wind.
‘Shimmer’ is apparent alchemy – clay burnished to metal. The process of mark making imitates the quick, rhythmic strokes of metal work. Some surfaces have the hard glint of polished metal while others are softened by time worn dents & scratches.
Work is held in public, corporate and private collections in Britain and abroad.
CPA Fellow.

Ben Brierley

Ben Brierley

My work is wheel thrown, hand built, and assembled using stoneware and porcelain clays. Once assembly is complete, still soft forms are decorated with slips and engobes, and may have wood ash and or shino glazes applied. Pieces are placed and fired to 1400°C in a wood fired anagama cross draft kiln for three to four days. Some pieces may have multiple firings until the desired qualities are achieved.
My workshop is situated within Loughborough University School of the Arts.
Work may be viewed by appointment.

David Brown

David Brown

I use a variety of techniques depending on what I am trying to achieve. These include throwing, Slab building, coiling, press-moulding and pinching.
I also use many methods of achieving textural surfaces.
My work is fired in an electric kiln to 1250 degrees. (oxidised stoneware)

Sandy Brown - Fellow

Sandy Brown - Fellow

Sandy Brown is internationally known as an influential figure in European and world ceramics. Over 30 museums worldwide hold pieces of her work in their collections, including the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; World Ceramic Centre, Ichon, Korea; Winnipeg Art Gallery, Canada; Frankfurt Museum of Applied Arts, Germany etc.
She has been the subject of two major Arts-Council funded solo touring shows; and has had numerous shows in USA, Japan, Holland, Germany, South Africa and Australia. She has been invited as a guest presenter at ceramic art Conferences in USA, UK, China and Australia, and to do residencies in China, Denmark, Germany and Australia.

Susan Bruce

Susan Bruce

Handbuilt porcelain jug. Fired to 1260 in an electric kiln. Painted slip decoration and transparent glaze on the inside. 20 cms approx.
Member of the Suffolk Craft Society, and more work can be viewed on their website.
Author of 'The Art of Handbuilt Ceramics' published by the Crowood Press.

Adam Buick

Adam Buick

My work uses a single pure jar form as a canvas to map my observations from an ongoing study of my surroundings. I incorporate stone and locally dug clay into my work to create a narrative, one that conveys a unique sense of place. The unpredictable nature of each jar comes from the inclusions and their metamorphosis during firing. This individuality and tension between materials speaks of the human condition and how the landscape shapes us as individuals.
The Materials used in my work are integral to the meaning of each piece. I intensionally source my own local materials using them unrefined to show my relationship with the landscape. I add clays and stones to the main body before I throw, this gives a random and spontaneous feel to my work. I like to experiment with new sources constantly at different stages of the ceramic process. Combining different clays, adding stone to glazes or laying seaweed onto the surface of a pot as its fired.
All my work is hand thrown and the large pieces are made in two sections or more. I have a wood fired kiln and all the work is fired to stoneware temperatures. I mix and create my own glazes, my particular interest is in the opacity of Jun glazes.

Vanessa Bullick

Vanessa Bullick

The pots are thrown on the wheel using a grogged white stoneware. Then the pots are burnished and some are textured using a thick slip. They are then fired to 1000 degrees in an electric kiln. Once fired, pots are patterned using a thinner slip to create a resist pattern.
The pots are fired in a bin of sawdust using different woods including pine, oak and sycamore to vary effects. Stripped and spotted pots now have the slip removed to reveal the pattern.
Workshop is located in Cellardyke, Fife.

Karen Bunting - Fellow

Karen Bunting - Fellow

All the pieces are reduction-fired stoneware, mostly thrown and then individually worked upon to bring out the particular qualities of each piece. I use a limited range of clays, slips and glazes - always working within a restricted palette of colour.
The reduction firing brings about a cohesion of surface and body through the particular chemical interactions which take place in the kiln with this firing technique.
I want the form and the decoration to be intimately related and for there to be no spatial illusion created by the decoration. The reduction firing produces muted colours, which are often marked out with darker lines of patterning.
When I decorate I am mapping out the surface of the pot drawing attention to aspects of the shape of the skin which contains the volume within.
Working in Hackney,London.

Ian Byers - Fellow

Ian Byers - Fellow

I am exploring change and evolution using ceramics as a medium for sculptural ideas. I often work on a series of intuitively developing and metamorphosing forms.

Process
My forms are made using a number of processes: modelling, casting, carving, then finally slip casting or press moulding. The work is normally fired to 1160°C

Jan Byrne

Jan Byrne

My work is mainly ceramic with found or made objects.
It has many layers of decoration. The pieces are becoming increasingly fine art in nature and represent my thoughts, feelings or ideas, which often mirror events, personal to me or are part of our collective experience