CPA Members Profiles - H

CPA Members Profiles – H

For a complete list of Association members, please see our Member Listing web page.

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Jennifer Hall

Jennifer Hall

Jennifer’s ongoing aim is to develop a comprehensive range of pots that enliven the daily rituals of taking nourishment. Jennifer is drawn to earthenware for its warmth of colour and softness of edge.
Thrown on a kick wheel, slip is then brushed, poured, dipped, trailed and sgraffitoed on the pots. They are bisque fired then gazed with a non-toxic lead glaze and fired to 1060 degrees.
Her pots do not challenge but give comfort, they appeal to the eye, sit comfortably in the hand and are gentle on the lips, enriching meal times.

Janet Halligan

Janet Halligan

I make trompe –l’oeil sculptural work such as bags, shoes and boxes of bric-a-brac.
The work is hand built from slabs with modeled details in stoneware. The pieces are glazed using a range of stoneware glazes and finished with platinum and copper lustres.
There is also a range of related vessels –primarily jugs and mugs featuring different fastenings. I am also developing a range of vessels and sculptural pieces inspired by landscape.

Jane Hamlyn - Honorary Fellow

Jane Hamlyn - Honorary Fellow

Salt glazed stoneware pots.

Keiko Harada

Keiko Harada

Originally from Japan, I obtained the degree of BA, Art and Design at Leeds Metropolitan University in 1999. Oriental influences are strong in my clay work, which springs from my long involvement with Japanese calligraphy and Textiles. I express my feeling for nature and the human spirit in an abstract way, using calligraphy brushes to emphasize the spontaneous movement of line. I am interested in Photography as well. Mainly take landscape and nature.
My pieces are selected from International Ceramics Competitions; the Fletcher Challenge in New Zealand; Mashiko and Mino in Japan.
Invited to Summer- Workshops/ Symposiums held in Serbia, Japan, Slovenia, Turkey and Latvia since 2004 -2010.

Richard St. John Heeley

Richard St. John Heeley

I have been visiting the North Wales coast of the Llyn Peninsula for over 30 years. These regular pilgrimages from my London studio are a ritual that is the foundation of my work.
I spend these visits walking the coastal path and recording its textures, shapes, and structures. I try to capture the contrasting movements between the edges of the land and sea by using lines and brushstrokes that have a visceral quality.
Painting on location in all weathers is incredibly important to capture designs that match the fluid quality of throwing and the fast slipped brushstrokes that I use. I believe the subject of landscape has a simple quiet affinity with the clay. I bring my sketchbooks back to the studio for development. My aim is to refine and simplify the designs and to ensure that they work in harmony with the form.
I high fire using oxidation and reduction atmospheres, which gives me a palette that ranges from natural stoneware tones to contrasting slips on the canvas of porcelain. I enjoy a deep appreciation of Eastern ceramic traditions and let them influence my designs and techniques: stoneware glazes and forms from China, construction and firing techniques from Japan, and Korean brush decoration.
I mix a range of cobalt and manganese pigments or ‘Gosu’, to use the Japanese name. I compose the recipes to produce a strong variation in tone and brush stroke quality. These slips are made from local clay dug from the sea cliffs, and occasionally with flake iron found on the beaches. I like to use these materials and other elements from the area to reinforce this narrative in the finished work.

Regina Heinz - Fellow

Regina Heinz - Fellow

Regina Heinz is known internationally for her tactile ceramic sculptures with highly distinctive abstract designs. Regina studied Fine Art and Ceramics in Vienna, Geneva and London. Regina received funding from the Crafts Council to set up her studio in South-London in 1998.
She is a Crafts Council Selected Member, a Fellow of the Craft Potters Association of Great Britain, and a member of the International Academy of Ceramics. Regina Heinz has lectured worldwide, including the International Ceramics Festival in Aberystwyth, Wales.
Water is a recurrent motif in Regina’s ceramic work, translated into fluid undulating forms and abstract flowing designs. Her work is hand-built from soft slabs and decorated either with a low firing Lithium glaze (1030° C) or a high firing matte stoneware glaze (1245° C) that produces a beautiful fresco-like surface.
Emmanuel Cooper, editor, curator and art critic, wrote of her work: “Regina’s pieces have a powerful sculptural quality and appear tactile and organic. The sensual curves of the forms suggest both the intimacy of the body and the flowing lines of landscape, though equally, they can be seen as purely abstract in dealing with line, volume, mass and colour”.
Her award-winning work is widely published and held in public and private collections around the world, such as the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge and the Museum of Contemporary Ceramics in Gifu, Japan.
Regina has been specialising in architectural ceramics since 2011. Portfolio includes a bespoke art-work design for 2000 cabins for P&O’s luxury cruise-ship Britannia, launched in 2015.

Rick Henham

Rick Henham

Plain forms worked to a completely smooth finish, help create the effect I’m after in this range of work. Comprised mainly of black and white bowls and vases in thrown stoneware with a simple motif cut into the glaze.... weather worn pebbles, surf on the shore and the meandering horizon line are an influence.
Trained University of Westminster, Harrow (93-96) and worked from The Chocolate Factory in Hackney, London for several years before moving to Cornwall.
Based at Gaolyard Studios in St Ives since then.

Akiko Hirai - Fellow

Akiko Hirai - Fellow

Combination of hand-builts and thrown ceramic ware (practical and decorative). The pieces are fired at Akiko's studio at the Chocolate Factory N16 in London.
The studio opens to public twice a year. Accept visits only by appointment.

Terri Holman

Terri Holman

Terri studied ceramics at Cardiff School of Art graduating in 1981. For the past 20 years she has lived on the edge of Dartmoor near Bovey Tracey.
Terri uses rolled slabs of clay to make vessels that occupy a shallow space. When the clay is rolled, it is often impressed with found objects, giving patterns, grids or more random marks. The colour and surface quality is suggestive of the landscape that she is surrounded by. The drawn line is also important as is the delicate shading of colour to emphasize the illusion of a greater depth.
The vessels are bisque fired then taken to 1260 degrees centigrade in a gas reduction kiln Some pots are then highlighted with enamels.

Matt Horne

All of my pots are hand thrown in porcelain, or a very fine white stoneware clay. Crystalline glaze is very special in the fact that crystals actually GROW in the glaze during the firing. They grow randomly, making every piece completely unique.
Crystalline glaze is very fluid at high temperatures, so the pot has to be placed on a pedestal and placed in a dish, to catch the runoff during the firing. When the kiln reaches the maximum temperature (up to 1280c) it is then cooled to a specific holding temperature - this is the time when the crystals form in the glaze. The amount of time held at this temperature determines the size and shape of the crystals.
When all has cooled down, there is the delicate operation of removing the pot from the pedestal and grinding the base smooth.
Crystalline glazing is time consuming & expensive to produce. There can be many failures, but when all goes well the effects are stunning!

Ashley Howard - Fellow

Ashley Howard - Fellow

Thrown and altered porcelain to stoneware with subsequent enamel and lustre firings.

Graham Hudson

Graham Hudson

My current work consists of small batch production and individual functional tableware pieces informed by a strong interest in both ancient and contemporary ceramics and manmade patterns, textures and colours in local landscapes and architecture. I have a strong interest in materials and process, and continually trial new ideas, keeping my work moving and developing. I try to keep pieces simple, unfussy and contemporary, my intention is for them to be both visually appealing and a pleasure to handle and use.
Current pieces are either Slip-Cast and altered, thrown or press moulded, in semi-porcelain and terracotta bodies. Coloured slips and decorative surfaces are added to greenware and a white tin glaze is applied after bisque.